Inca Pisac


At the mouth of the valley lie the ruins of an Inca citadel called Pisac. From the top of a hill, gorges plunging down on each side, the ruins stand sentry over the southern entrance of the Sacred Valley. They served three purposes: military, religious, and agricultural. Terraces curve around the mountain below the ruins. The terraces were created by dragging dirt from far away and padding it into otherwise unusable terrain. The variations in altitude created different ecological zones to experiment with agriculture. They once grew a surplus of food, a testament to the Inca’s excellent agricultural skills. On the other side, hundreds of Inca tombs honeycomb the walls. The ruins themselves are separated into four groups: P’isaqa, Inti Watana, Qalla Q’asa, and Kinchiraqay. Inti Watana is home to baths, altars, fountains, and the Temple of the Sun. The temple was an astronomical observatory and is perfectly aligned with the sunrise of the winter solstice. Inside is the Intihuatana, the “hitching post of the sun,” which looks similar to a sundial but was used to determine the arrival of different seasons. Pisac is one of the best reflections of the Inca’s spiritual beliefs and one of the greatest archeologic sites in Peru.

Inca Pisac


Address:

3.5 km from Pisac

Hours of Operation:

Monday – Sunday 7:00 am – 5:30 pm

 

Inca Pisac


 

Inca Pisac


S/. 130 ($47) for Cusco Tourist Ticket (access to all sites around Cusco, one-time access to each site, valid for 10 days)

 

Inca Pisac


It’s a fairly steep two-hour climb to Inca Pisac, but taxis are available on Urubamba Road to the peak of the hill and back. Most people opt to take a taxi up and hike back down.

 

Inca Pisac


What’s nearby? 

Restaurants:

The Horno Colonial San Francisco (372 Mariscal Castilla, Pisac) is a large clay oven that dates back to 1830 and still serves toasty empanadas. It’s open from 6:00 am – 6:00 pm, and small snacks cost about S/. 2.50. A more recent eatery, Horno Típico de Santa Lucia, serves similiar food. It also features a castillo de cuye, a mini-castle for guinea pigs, and a craft shop.
Mullu (Plaza De Armas 352, Písac) hangs over the plaza and features a balcony–the ideal spot for watching people barter in the colorful Pisac Market below. It’s open 9:00 am-9:00 pm, and serves a mix of Asian and Peruvian meals that cost between S/. 10 – 30.

Other attractions:

The most well-known attraction is the Pisac Market, most popular Sundays but also open Tuesdays and Thursdays. It fills the main plaza and spills over into the surrounding streets. Sellers travel down from the Andean mountains carrying ceramics, ponchos, instruments, tapestries, and locally-grown produce. The market begins at 9:00 am and tapers midafternoon.
Both botanists and those looking for a beautiful spot to sit in the shade will be interested in the Jardín Botanico, a large garden with many local specimens. It’s open 8:00 am – 4:30 pm, and admission is S/. 8.
If you have time between exploring present and ancient Pisac, and you have an interest in Andean culture, Amaru is a community of weavers about 20 minutes from Pisac. You’re able to pick the plants that produce different colored dyes for the wool. Then help shear sheep and make a base for weaving. Check out the intricate designs for sale, woven by hand. Amaru is a hands-on, welcoming experience that truly makes you feel closer to authentic Andean life.

Inca Pisac


Interested in touring Peru and visiting Inca Pisac? We offer five different tours that explore this region.

Clink on the links below and explore the incredible country of Peru.

Machu Picchu & The Sacred Valley – 9 Days      Best of Peru Tour – 15 Days      Explore South America – 30 Days      Best of South America – 21 Days      Best of South America: Peru, Argentina, Chile, & Ecuador – 25 Days 

 

Title Address Description
Pisac, Peru

Inca Pisac

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